Final Portfolio for Digital Storytelling

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*I am currently wrapping up my fourth semester of the Information and Learning Technologies master’s program at University of Colorado, Denver.  This post is my Final Portfolio for a course titled Digital Storytelling.  Here you will find links to several creative pieces, written responses and critiques, and online engagement with other digital story creators and fellow CU Denver students.  I reflect upon each of these pieces and write about how I enjoyed them and how they have shaped my learning and understanding of digital storytelling.

Digital Storytelling Critiques

I discovered so many amazing digital stories throughout this class that a part of me wants to list every single one that I critiqued!  I am in awe of people and what they can create and put out there for the world to see.  But in an effort to showcase what has helped in my understanding of digital storytelling, as well as the stories that pertain to my theme, I have chosen a smaller selection to discuss here.  (It wasn’t easy!)

  • Digital Story Critique #2: Bear 71  This interactive documentary is the true story of a female grizzly bear monitored by wildlife conservation officers from 2001-2009.  Bear 71 reimagines the bear’s story from an omniscient narrative vantage point, speaking directly to the viewer, with several interactive elements scattered throughout the story.  I had never experienced anything quite like this before and I was blown away.  Not just by the topic of the story (which will stay with me forever), but by the notion that a digital story is so much more than just a video (not to say that “just a video” isn’t as impactful as other mediums).  It’s just that this story was truly the first time that my knowledge of digital storytelling had widened to include any other mediums at all.  I realized just how small my frame of view was when it came to digital storytelling and how there are actually so many ways one can tell a great story.  This piece was so beautifully done and I will continue to share it for as long as it’s live on the web.Bear 71 Header

  • Digital Story Critique #3: Josef  I found this digital story titled Josef on StoryCenter.org.  It was created by Brad Johnson, during a workshop facilitated by the Center for Digital Storytelling.   Brad tells the story of his grandfather’s obsession with food and his constant need for his family to acknowledge it.  I chose to critique this short film because it related very closely to my own theme…a self-reflection on my life so far, through food.  This piece is what really helped me to hone in on exactly what my theme was and what it meant to me.  I have several of my own memories from my father, just as Brad did of his grandfather, and I started to think about all of the digital stories of my own that I could tell.  I realized that I wanted to focus more on the food traditions of my own family and what I wanted to accomplish going forward in the future, instead of focusing on the past and how unhappy I was with how things were done in my childhood.Feature_Image

  • Digital Story Critique #6: Tourte Milanaise  This digital story was really a turning point for me in the semester.  It’s a short video titled Tourte Milanaise, from a farm-to-table video blog by Aube Giroux.  She is a passionate organic gardener and home cook who likes to share the stories of how food gets to our dinner plates.  This video really spoke to me and to be blunt, it broke my focal theme for the semester wide open!  I had been focusing on the past, a self-reflection on my life so far, through food, and this video made me realize how much I truly just wanted to focus on the future.  I didn’t want to dwell on my sad memories any longer, I only wanted to daydream about and plan for future traditions with my own daughter.   Watching this specific video made me yearn for the future and it evoked feelings of hope and excitement.  All of Ms. Giroux’s videos do!  (Side note:  My two-year-old is obsessed with watching these videos!)Tourte Header

  • Digital Story Critique #10: FOOD  I’m listing this digital story, a stop-motion animation video titled, FOOD purely because it was done so well and it related nicely to my theme.  It was the 2015 Real Food Media Contest Winner for Best Animation and brought interviews with real eaters from around the world to life as ‘edible characters’ who discussed the impacts of their own food choices.  The messages in the video really resonated with me as my husband and I are trying so hard to instill good food habits in our own daughter.  FOOD Header
  • Digital Story Critique #12: Eat: The Story of Food  This digital story is a full website that absolutely blew me away.  It’s incredibly beautiful, entirely interactive, and extremely informative!  The website is called Eat: The Story of Food, and it’s actually a byproduct of National Geographic’s television series of the same name.  I loved discovering this website, as it truly shows the wide realm of what can be a digital story.  Eat Header

Literature Responses

  • Response to Lambert’s “Digital Storytelling: Capturing Lives, Creating Community” – Chapter 1  This was the first chapter (of several) of Lambert’s book that I read.  It was also the first time that I truly gave digital storytelling any deep thought.  My main takeaways from this chapter were:  explaining an idea versus telling a story, how digital storytelling helps with sustaining memories, various genres of stories and what they convey/explain to us, and identity construction.Work of the Story

  • Response to Alexander’s “The New Digital Storytelling” – Chapter 5  This was the only chapter i read from Alexander’s book and it turned out to be incredibly informative and has helped shaped my world of digital storytelling more than I expected.  I hadn’t given much thought to social media as a form of digital storytelling, but Alexander’s analyses of podcasts, web videos, and VoiceThread really broadened my view and understanding!  I enjoyed this chapter and wish I had read more from this book.Header

Digital Storytelling Assignments

DS106 Assignments

  • Visual Assignment: Selfie with Albert Einstein  This visual assignment from the DS106 Assignment Bank challenged me to find a historic photograph and place myself into the scene.  This was my first assignment from the bank and I remember thinking, “Wow, I really get to be creative on this one!”  I spent a long time (too much time) thinking about what historic moment I wanted to be in and I just couldn’t pick…until I remembered the iconic photograph of good ol’ Albert laughing at something.  This was truly the beginning of me realizing that digital stories can start very small but can become very powerful and/or impactful depending on how they’re done!  (I’m also just proud of my Photoshop skills on this one.)  Selfie Header

  • Audio Assignment: A Song for My Daughter  This audio assignment from the DS106 Assignment Bank was really difficult for me.  It challenged me to sing a song and record myself three different times, then mash it all together without any acoustics.  I am not a singer, nor do I have any kind of song-worthy voice!  But I decided to take the assignment to heart and do the best I could.  I sang a song for my daughter and it was so much fun watching her listen to it.  It was extremely difficult for me to post the song and put it out into the vast wonderland of the worldwide web, but I did it.  This was the beginning of my inner walls starting to crumble.  Digital storytelling is about putting yourself out there and showing vulnerabilities and I did just that!Audio Assignment Header

Daily Creates

  • Daily Create #1: Can’t You Hear Me Knocking?  This was my first Daily Create (and my very first assignment for the course!) and it was a very simple assignment – record yourself knocking on something ordinary or strange.  I was incredibly nervous to create this and put it “out there” for people to see and hear because I felt like an imposter in the world of DS106 and I didn’t yet feel “qualified” to be creating digital stories in any shape or form.  But I was actually excited to make something so different and creative and so I just did it.  I made the recording and put it out there!  It was such a simple thing, but when I got a comment from a stranger, you’d think I had just won the lottery.  I had tweeted the link to this assignment and used a few hashtags to get it some attention.  This was my first taste of the power of Twitter as a tool for engagement and interaction with strangers.Red Dutch Oven Header

  • Daily Create #6: Ordinary, But Beautiful  This Daily Create allowed me to be very creative and even use my own food photography.  I loved the idea of finding something ordinary that I thought to be beautiful.  I happen to think almost all foods are beautiful, but fresh, unaltered ones even more so.  While writing this post, I remember thinking about how much my idea of digital storytelling had begun to change.  I thought up so many ways that this specific assignments could be used to generate digital stories and how it could be used in a classroom.Radish Header

  • Daily Create #14: Wordsworth Found  This might be my favorite Daily Create!  It doesn’t relate to my theme at all, but when I realized I wanted to do this assignment but didn’t have time to leave books anywhere and take a picture, I remembered that I had found my own book once.  This single image of this wonderful Wordsworth book represents a digital story all of my own.  I think that someday soon, I might actually take this image and record myself narrating the story behind the discovery of the book!  With this being created in week 14, it’s obvious that my excitement over digital storytelling had grown immensely throughout the semester.Wordsworth Found Header

Scholarship/Resource Responses

  •  Response to Digital Storytelling Scholarship: #3  I really enjoyed watching this TED talk by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie titled, “The Danger of a Single Story.”  Not only is Ngozi Adichie an incredible author and storyteller, but her explanation of the danger of a single story is very powerful and will stay with me for a long time.  In this talk she states, “Stories matter.  Many stories matter.  Stories have been used to dispossess and to malign, but stories can also be used to empower and to humanize.  Stories can break the dignity of a people, but stories can also repair that broken dignity.”DangerOfASingleStory
  • Response to Digital Storytelling Resource: #5   Real Food Media is a gem of an organization that is devoted to growing the movement for sustainable food and farming around the country and the world.  They have two main core programs, Food MythBusters and Real Food Films.  I love everything about this organization, from the very causes they promote and support, to their super “pretty” and well designed website, to the ever important messages behind the digital stories they produce!Real Food Media Header

  • Response to Digital Storytelling Scholarship: #7  I am including this post because it was nice to read and “visit” with a more simple piece on storytelling in general.  This piece is a great article from the Harvard Business Review titled, How to Tell a Great Story by Carolyn O’Hara.  Ms. O’Hara writes about how to use stories in a business setting, stories that can support a project, stories that help explain to an employee how he might improve, and stories that inspire a team that is facing challenges.  I appreciated reading about something that I could utilize in my corporate workplace.How to Tell a Great Story Header

Social Media and Networking Interactions

This course really, truly helped with my understanding of ecological learning.  I commented on dozens of my peer’s blog posts this semester and enjoyed some friendly ‘back and forth’ with fellow students.  I also received some wonderful commentary, not only from students but from strangers as well!  I was also very diligent and tweeted a link to every single post I wrote for this course, determined to utilize Twitter to it’s full extent.  I found myself in some very interesting Twitter conversations and was always over the moon with my engagement with complete strangers and even with the creators of the digital stories that I critiqued!  Here are just a few samples:

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Reflective Summary for ILT5340 Digital Storytelling: Weeks 14 & 15

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*I am currently working my way through my fourth semester of the Information and Learning Technologies master’s program at University of Colorado, Denver.  This is the seventh post within a series of reflections that I’ve been assigned to write for a course titled Digital Storytelling.

Weeks 14 & 15

The semester is winding down and although I couldn’t be more ecstatic to have 12 weeks off of school, I keep finding myself thinking of ways to stay immersed in digital storytelling.  I’ve become addicted to the creativity, exploration, and engagement that comes with telling stories in the digital world and I think I will continue to explore all throughout the summer!  I’m not going to write too much here because I’m working on a more in-depth media reflection that I’ll post next week.  But here is a list of what I’ve done over the last two weeks with a few details about what I created and learned.  Thanks for reading!

Response to Alexander’s “The New Digital Storytelling” – Chapter 5

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*I am currently working my way through my fourth semester of the Information and Learning Technologies master’s program at University of Colorado, Denver.  This is the seventh post within a series of critiques on various readings that I’ve been assigned to write for a course titled Digital Storytelling.

Book CoverThe New Digital Storytelling: Creating Narratives with New Media by Bryan Alexander, Chapter 5: Social Media Storytelling

In Social Media Storytelling, Bryan Alexander discusses three specific social media platforms that have proven to be extremely successful tools for digital storytelling.  He mentions that these platforms – podcastsweb videos, and VoiceThread, are very unique in their storytelling properties and are extremely interconnected with not only the “audience” but other platforms as well.  Over the years, these platforms have evolved and have made digital storytelling what it is today.

At first I didn’t think I would learn anything new from this chapter.  I feel fairly familiar with all popular social media platforms and this far into the semester, I’ve already broadened my view of what can be considered a digital story.  But I’m pleasantly surprised and pleased to have learned quite a bit.

I have never listened to a Podcast before and I found the history behind them covered here to be very interesting.  I agree that the term podcast is a bit of a misnomer in that iPod and broadcast do not accurately describe the current reality of what makes a podcast, but it’s a name that has stuck.  According to Alexander, Podcasts have three important storytelling elements:

First, they open up a range of production options: one or many speakers, prewritten versus improvisational speech, subject matter expert versus enabling speaker.  Second, they lack a way for listeners to directly and publicly contribute.  The social media aspect is therefore to occur elsewhere.  Third, the programs demonstrate the power of the human voice to tell stories without any additional sound or other media.

Alexander then proceeds to discuss, in detail, several examples of podcasts.  At first I was a bit annoyed because I wanted to know more about them as they pertain to storytelling, but then I realized his explanations of each example portrayed just how various stories can be told.  The in-depth analyses of each one did actually teach me about the different ways that characters and their interactions, single-voice versus multiple-voice, music, and various sound effects can affect the way the story is told.  I also started making a list of podcasts to listen to since I’ve never given one a try before!  (This American Life and Serial are on my list for sure.)  I do wish that Alexander had broken up the podcast section into labeled paragraphs, with the labels being the names of the Podcasts, just because I felt that the flow of this section was quite awkward.

The web video section was useful to me in that it altered how I viewed videos on YouTube.  I’m surprised, but I had no idea that there were incredibly successful video stories that spanned multiple videos!  I’m talking like over a hundred (the lonelygirl15 project)!  Of course I’ve been viewing YouTube videos as digital stories, I just didn’t realize there were extensive series out there.  I also found Alexander’s explanation of the “new” audience quite interesting:

The entire swarm of YouTube’s channels and comments, clip arrangements, and tag clusters is driven by a large audience – but that word is no longer correct.  “Audience” no longer describes this complex mix of many watchers, a large number of arrangers and commenters, uploaders and creators, with amateur and professional roles cutting across all strata.

The audience of these videos have essentially become a part of the storytelling process, something I had never considered before.  The section of the chapter was entirely new to me as well.  I’d never heard of VoiceThread before and the concept behind it seems truly spectacular.  Alexander explains it as, “It’s a unique web service, seemingly based on multimedia annotation of media documents.  Users upload images, text, or video clips, which other users can comment on with text, audio, or video.  Built in Flash, VoiceThread presents all of these functions with simplicity and playfulness.”  I looked it up and plan to spend more time there after the semester ends.

All in all, this chapter turned out to be incredibly informative and has helped shaped my world of digital storytelling even more.

Digital Story Critique #15: The Surprising Science of How We “Taste” Food

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*I am currently working my way through my fourth semester of the Information and Learning Technologies master’s program at University of Colorado, Denver.  This is the fifteenth post within a series of critiques on digital stories that I’ve been assigned to write for a course titled Digital Storytelling.

This week’s critique is on a short video produced by Kathryn Carlson titled, The Surprising Science of How We Taste FoodI found the video inside an article by April Fulton titled, The Taste of Food Goes Far Beyond the Tongue.  Kathryn Carlson is a freelance documentary videographer and April Fulton is the senior blogger and wrangler for The Plate, the official food blog for National Geographic (we all know how much I love Nat Geo from posts like this one, this one, and this one).  April’s article tells the story behind the video – that was created for another article (which is sadly only available to paid subscribers) – about how we experience taste.

Salsa

To critique this piece, I used the following traits from Jason Ohler’s “Assessing digital stories, new media narrative“: 1.) research, 2.) writing, and 3.) media application.

  • Research – I don’t think that Ms. Carlson needed to do any research on the actual subject itself because the bulk of the video is footage of Oxford Psychologist, Charles Spence, narrating and discussing the topic to the camera. But even if she didn’t need to research the science behind how we taste, it’s obvious that she researched what to shoot and film for the video.  Her footage and choice of clips clearly demonstrate a knowledge of what is appealing to an audience and what makes a good visual story.Charles Spence
  • Writing – I don’t know if the narration was scripted or just pieced together after asking Dr. Spence several questions, but the narration of the film is done really well and flows nicely. The film opens with quantitative information such as percentages, facts, and figures, which let us know that Dr. Spence is a credible resource.  He then goes on to explain that what we think of taste in our mouths is not what is really happening.  He discusses how flavor is the most multi-sensory of all experiences; the sound of crunching and crackling, the smell in your nose, the taste in your mouth, and then the visual appearance of what you’re going to eat or drink.  He says that all of these cues come together and bring about the experience that we think is in our mouths but really generates from our brains.  I found the most interesting content to be how colors are attached to certain flavors and because our tastes are so visual, it’s actually a sort of trickery in our brains. Nine Screens
  • Media application – As stated in the research bullet above, Ms. Carlson obviously has an incredible knowledge of what is appealing to an audience and what makes a good visual story. With this particular video, she did an excellent job of using different types of visuals.  For example, she shows people eating, but not in an awkward “I can hear them chewing” kind of way.  She includes clips of Dr. Spence scattered throughout, breaking up various elements.  At one point, she shows multiple screens at once, fitting nine clips of footage on screen at one time.  Carlson even has a short clip that utilizes stop-motion animation to move “bad” foods off the screen and move “good” foods in. Stop-Motion

For a video that’s only one minute and thirty-three seconds, Ms. Carlson fit in so many wonderful visual elements that combined with Dr. Spence’s narration, truly created a wonderful and informative short digital story!  I highly recommend taking two minutes to watch the video and learn something new today.  Just be careful not to get lost for an hour looking at the rest of the digital stories on National Geographic’s website!cake

*All images taken from short video.

Daily Create #15: Postcards from Miami

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#ds106 Daily Create: #tdc1576
Mix up a tourist slogan (real or made up) for one place with a picture of another place

*I am currently working my way through my fourth semester of the Information and Learning Technologies master’s program at University of Colorado, Denver.  This is the fifteenth post within a series of Daily Creates that I’ve been assigned to complete for a course titled Digital Storytelling.

Today’s Daily Create stated:  “It’s important to mess with reality a bit which is why I like this idea. Show an image of one place to promote tourism in another place that is obviously not that place.”

Having been born and raised in southern Florida, this one was easy for me…

Here’s a postcard from Miami, from me to you!

Fun in the Sun

*Header image from here.
*Postcard image found here, originally from here.

Response to Digital Storytelling Scholarship: #7

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*I am currently working my way through my fourth semester of the Information and Learning Technologies master’s program at University of Colorado, Denver.  This is the seventh post within a series of responses to digital storytelling resources that I’ve been assigned to write for a course titled Digital Storytelling.

Lately I have been responding to some incredible digital storytelling resources (here, here, and here), but this week I chose to find a “scholarship” to read and “learn me some things”.  During my search on “how to tell a story in a business setting” (because I’ve been wondering how learning about digital storytelling can help me in my current real world situation), I stumbled upon a great article from the Harvard Business Review titled, How to Tell a Great Story by Carolyn O’Hara.  Ms. O’Hara writes about how to use stories in a business setting, stories that can support a project, stories that help explain to an employee how he might improve, and stories that inspire a team that is facing challenges.How to Tell a Story

Ms. O’Hara mentions that “stories create “sticky” memories by attaching emotions to things that happen”.  This reminded me very much of a book I read for another course in this master’s program, titled, Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Stick and Others Die by Chip Heath and Dan Heath (you can read chapter 1 here for free!).  The underlying concept is that ideas and stories that “stick” create and cultivate success.  And although Ms. O’Hara wrote this article for a business setting, I feel that her content can be applied to multiple storytelling settings.

According to Ms. O’Hara, there are six key elements for telling a story:

  1. Start with a message – Each decision about your story should flow from these questions: Who is your audience and what is the message you want to share with them?
  2. Mine your own experiences – The best storytellers look to their own memories and life experiences for ways to illustrate their message.
  3. Don’t make yourself the hero – The more you celebrate your own decisions, the less likely your audience will connect with you and your message.
  4. Highlight a struggle – A story without a challenge simply isn’t very interesting.
  5. Keep it simple – Some of the most successful and memorable stories are relatively simple and straightforward.
  6. Practice makes perfect – Practice with friends, loved ones, and trusted colleagues to hone your message into the most effective and efficient story.

And several principles to remember:

Do:

  • Consider your audience — choose a framework and details that will best resonate with your listeners.
  • Identify the moral or message your want to impart.
  • Find inspiration in your life experiences.

Don’t:

  • Assume you don’t have storytelling chops — we all have it in us to tell memorable stories.
  • Give yourself the starring role.
  • Overwhelm your story with unnecessary details.

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Digital Story Critique #14: The Hunt for General Tso

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*I am currently working my way through my fourth semester of the Information and Learning Technologies master’s program at University of Colorado, Denver.  This is the fourteenth post within a series of critiques on digital stories that I’ve been assigned to write for a course titled Digital Storytelling.

This week’s critique is on a TEDTalk titled The Hunt for General Tso, given by Jennifer 8. Lee, who is quite possibly, one of the world’s most accomplished women (my mouth dropped open when I found her on LinkedIn).  Ms. Lee talks about her hunt for the origins of familiar Chinese-American dishes, exploring the hidden spots where these two cultures have combined to form a new cuisine.  She uses a mixture of visual content, humor, and wit to explain where certain Chinese-American dishes came from and how they are more popular than America’s biggest fast food chains.TED

I chose to critique this piece because it goes well with my focal theme for the semester (self reflection through food / food traditions) and it’s different from the websites and articles I’ve been reviewing.  Also, in the personal profile page on the TED website, Ms Lee wrote, “People don’t know I’m good at creating comedic short films and analyzing behaviors of straight men.”  With that sense of humor, I knew instantly I’d like to sit down and watch Ms. Lee talk about pretty much anything.  She also has a number as her middle initial.  I don’t know of many people who could pull that off.

Jennifer Lee

The TED website explains perfectly…
Why You Should Listen

To critique this piece, I used the following traits from Jason Ohler’s “Assessing digital stories, new media narrative“:  1.) research, 2.) sense of audience and 3.) media application.

  • Research – After digging a bit deeper into Ms. Lee’s work, I found that she actually wrote a book on the subject of her TEDTalk that was published shortly after this talk.  She obviously did more than enough research to not only present to the million plus viewers who have watched her talk, but to publish a successful book titled The Fortune Cookie Chronicles: Adventures in the World of Chinese Food.  Her speech during her talk, as well as the visual content she presented on screen, reflect the mental, emotional, and physical work she put into her research.
  • Sense of audience – Ms. Lee clearly had a great sense of her audience as not only was her speech interesting and informative, but it was quite humorous and witty as well.  She kept her entire talk extremely entertaining and the audience obviously really enjoyed it.  Here are a few excerpt from the transcripts that elicited quite a few laughs:

    And the house that John Wilkes Booth planned the assassination of Abraham Lincoln is actually also now a Chinese restaurant called Wok ‘n Roll, on H Street in Washington. (Laughter)

    So, let me present the question to you: If our benchmark for Americanness is apple pie, you should ask yourself, how often do you eat apple pie, versus how often do you eat Chinese food. Right? (Laughter)

    For example, I took a whole bunch of fortune cookies back to China, gave them to Chinese to see how they would react. What is this? Should I try it? Try it! What is it called? Fortune cookie. There’s a piece of paper inside! (Laughter) What is this?You’ve won a prize! What is this? It’s a fortune! Tasty!

    I love this dish. The original name in my book was actually called The Long March of General Tso, and he has marched very far indeed, because he is sweet, he is fried, and he is chicken — all things that Americans love. (Laughter)

    So, these people are going around China asking for chop suey, which is sort of like a Japanese guy coming here and saying, I understand you have a very popular dish in your country called “leftovers,” and it is particularly — (Laughter) — right? And not only that: this dish is particularly popular after that holiday you call Thanksgiving. (Laughter)

  • Media application – I’ve never been a fan of single-media stories.  I don’t like reading articles without images that enhance the story being told, or watching someone speak when they’re just standing there talking, or watching pictures in a slideshow without accompanying speech or text.  I prefer to be engaged and repeatedly interacting with the story being told.  Ms. Lee did an excellent job with her accompanying presentation.  Her images enhanced every point she was making and several of them were quite humorous and drove home a few laughs.  He presentation also enforced her research.  It showed that she physically went out into the world and interviewed people, photographed several different locations, and immersed herself in the topic she presented on. The Hunt for General Tso
*All images from the TEDTalk (here).

Visual Assignment: Find Yourself

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Visual Assignment from the DS106 Assignment Bank:
Find Yourself…or…My Own Boat!

*I am currently working my way through my fourth semester of the Information and Learning Technologies master’s program at University of Colorado, Denver.  This is the seventh post within a series of Creative Assignments that I’ve been tasked with completing for a course titled Digital Storytelling.

The design assignment that I chose from the DS106 Assignment Bank is called Find Yourself. It states, “Find your name in the environment around you. Look for your first name, parts of your first name, or even the individual letters that make up your name in the environment around you. Take photos and crop them together. Share. Enjoy!”

I knew immediately that I wanted to do this assignment as soon as I found it.  Having a weird name throughout my life has not been easy.  I’ve had to constantly (every.single.time) correct people’s pronunciation and spelling and I could never find a damn key chain!  (I know you know what I’m talking about…  At the end of every single school field trip, kids would come home with key chains or mugs or pens with their names on them.  Not me.  Never.)

Well, I was lucky enough to spend a summer in Spain when I was 17 and even luckier to come across this gem of a boat.  That, ladies and gentlemen, is my name.  On a boat.  Twice actually.  (Yes, I realized it doesn’t have my capital “A”, but I’ve never liked the stupid capital letter in the middle of my name anyways.)  I was so excited to see my name somewhere for the first (and only) time in my life and even happier that I was a tourist with a camera!

TiAnTiAn

Daily Create #14: Wordsworth Found

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#ds106 Daily Create: #tdc1572
Leave a Stack of Books for Someone

*I am currently working my way through my fourth semester of the Information and Learning Technologies master’s program at University of Colorado, Denver.  This is the fourteenth post within a series of Daily Creates that I’ve been assigned to complete for a course titled Digital Storytelling.

Today’s Daily Create stated:  “Leave 1, 2, or more books you no longer need to keep in a public place for someone else; if you choose leave a request to contact you by email. Take one photo and do not look back. This is modeled after The Reading Project.”

I don’t have a “Leave a Stack of Books for Someone” photo.  I’m playing the rebel role on this one and doing the opposite of what the activity asks for!  So I present to you, a picture of the one and only book I’ve ever found and taken home with me.  I found this book about five years ago, on a bench outside of a shop on Main Street, in downtown Durango.  It had no name attached to it, no one to claim it, and it’s a collection of poems by one of my most absolute favorite poets.  It’s like the book was meant for me.  (Sadly, I only have volume two of the twenty-five volume set, and this volume does not state the publication date.  The book is old, but online searching failed in helping me determine how old.  The entire set is for sale on eBay right now for $599, but my money tree quit growing money and keeps spitting bills at me. Weird how that happens.)

Wordsworth Found

William Wordsworth